Virginia Community Capital

Virginia Community Capital is a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) with a mission to create jobs, energize places, and promote an enhanced quality of life for Virginians. With offices in Christiansburg, Norfolk, and Richmond, we offer innovative and flexible financing tools throughout the state. In addition, we provide professional advisory services to individuals and organizations in low-to-moderate income and underserved communities. Virginia Community Capital’s subsidiary bank, VCC Bank, is an FDIC-insured, certified CDFI bank. VCC Bank offers banking products tailored to community banks and socially conscious investors. We also provide personal and business deposit products, including checking, savings, and certificates of deposit.

Related News

Virginia Community Capital | Monday, January 25, 2021

After four decades in the banking industry, Jane Henderson plans to retire this year as President and CEO of Virginia Community Capital (VCC). As the organization's founding executive director, Henderson has led VCC since its inception in 2006. Her banking career includes 29 years spent in community development finance. VCC, a community development financial institution (CDFI), was born out of a $15 million investment and a vision for an institution that served Virginia's most under-resourced communities.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau | Monday, December 14, 2020

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (Bureau) released a panel report as part of its rulemaking process under Dodd-Frank Act Section 1071 governing the collection and reporting of small business lending data. A panel was convened pursuant to the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act, comprised of representatives of the Bureau, the Office of Advocacy of the Small Business Administration, and the Office of Management and Budget. The panel consulted with representatives of small entities likely to be affected directly by a Section 1071 regulation, referred to as small entity representatives or SERs. These representatives included Cynthia Newell of City First Bank of DC and Jane Henderson of Virginia Community Capital. 

Next City | Thursday, October 29, 2020

Adecade ago, in the last economic crisis, mainstream banks abandoned Dianna Bowser and the Southside Community Development and Housing Corporation, where she's executive director. Founded in 1988, the nonprofit builds homes and provides counseling for first-time homeowners in and around Richmond, Virginia. ut that’s when Bowser first encountered Virginia Community Capital, a relatively new bank at the time. The bank stepped in to finance a major construction project for her organization. It has an unusual nonprofit ownership structure, a mission to serve underserved or disinvested communities, and startup capital that came from the state instead of private investors like most banks. The relationship has grown ever since.